Churchyards,memorials and trees

Churchyard Management

A churchyard is a highly visible symbol of the Christian faith. Their appearance and condition says much about the church to which they belong. They can be places of quiet and reflection with wildlife habitats and ancient and distinctive trees. They hold the collective ancient and modern memory of the parish and above all, they are places to grieve, to mourn and to contemplate.

Memorials

The message at all Church of England funerals, wherever they happen, is one of hope. Although there is sadness because someone you know and love has died, in every Church of England funeral there will also be a message of hope in life after death. Each person is unique – in personality and in life experience. A Church of England funeral allows you to give thanks for the unique person you knew and loved in a way that gives comfort and hope. Help to arrange a funeral, cope with bereavement and more can be found on the Church of England's Here for Everyone website

Christian churchyards are governed by Canon Law which sets out how they should be managed and the type of commemorations allowed. The purpose of Canon Law is to ensure churchyards reflect the Christian faith and remain peaceful, dignified and respectful places welcome to all. This means that many of the features allowed in cemeteries may not be permitted in a churchyard.

It is essential that the meaning and consequences of burial in consecrated ground is fully understood. The nature of the rite of burial is to say 'farewell' to the deceased and to commend them to the mercy and love of God in Christ and to await the transformation of resurrection. There is accordingly a theological finality to all interments, including those of cremated remains, in ground consecrated according to the rites of the Church of England. This is inconsistent with the concept of portability of remains and the future prospect of exhumation.

By seeking a burial in consecrated ground, families are submitting to the jurisdiction of the Consistory Court which regulates the type of headstone or other marker which may be erected. This jurisdiction exists for reasons which are in part theological and in part aesthetic, since what may be unobjectionable in a municipal cemetery might be considered inappropriate (or even offensive) in an historic churchyard.

Before making any decisions please make sure you are aware of what can and cannot be permitted in a churchyard.

 

Chancellor’s Churchyard Rules

It is unlawful for a headstone or other memorial to be introduced into a churchyard without permission. However, for administrative convenience and to minimise expense, the Chancellor delegates to parochial clergy the authority to permit the introduction of a monument provided it is of a type which complies with the detailed provisions set out in the Chancellor’s churchyard rules. During a vacancy, or in the absence of a priest-in-charge, this delegated authority is exercised by the area dean. Applications for memorials should generally not be made until six months have passed since the interment.

 

Churchyard memorials

A headstone is a public statement about the person who is being commemorated. Making the right choice of stone, design and inscription is important not only to the relatives or friends who are going to provide the memorial, but also to the wider community because of the effect which the headstone may have upon the appearance of the churchyard. Attractive, well-conceived designs by skilled and imaginative craftsmen should be encouraged. Headstone Designs by Artists

Epitaphs should honour the dead, comfort the living and inform posterity. They will be read long after the bereaved have themselves passed away. Inscriptions are encouraged which give a flavour of the life of the person commemorated rather than blandly recording a name and dates. A memorial stone is not the right place for a statement about how members of the family feel about the deceased nor how they would address him or her were they still alive. Passages of scripture, which have a timeless quality, are to be preferred.

 

Memorials in Church

The general rule is that a faculty for a memorial tablet inside a church will not be granted until a period of five years has elapsed from the date of death of the person commemorated. It is intended in this way to provide a period of reflection about the best means of commemoration, which is often found to be helpful.

 

Churchyard Forms and Guidance

Chancellor’s Churchyard Rules

Churchyard memorials

Damaged and Unsafe Headstones

Headstone Designs by Artists

Application for a new churchyard monument or inscription (faculty not required - complies with Chancellor's Rules)

Application for a new churchyard monument or Inscription (faculty required - does not comply with Chancellor's Rules)

 

Closing and Closed Churchyards

Section 4(1)(ii)(c) of the Parochial Church Councils (Powers) Measure 1956 sets out the responsibility of the Parochial Church Council for the maintenance of a churchyard. If a churchyard becomes full and unable to accommodate new burials, then it is possible to apply for the churchyard to be formally closed. Burials may still take place in existing graves where there is space for another internment and it is possible to continue using a cremated remains plot.

If a PCC decides it wishes to close its churchyards an application has to be made to the Ministry of Justice to obtain an Order in Council. A Parochial Church Council may apply for a closing order in the circumstances set out in the Guidance issued by the Ministry of Justice. Attached is the form of application for a closing order. Please contact the Ministry of Justice before you make an application to close a churchyard (or to enquire whether a closing order has already been made in respect of a particular churchyard) to ensure that you have the latest version of their application form.
Tel: 0203 334 2813. Email:
coroners@justice.gsi.gov.uk.

Once a churchyard has been closed for further burials by Order in Council responsibility for maintenance falls to the Parish or District Council

A list of churchyards in the Diocese of Sheffield that have closure orders can be found here.

Notes on the maintenance of closed churchyards can be found here

 

War memorials

War memorials are historical artefacts that record the sentiment and memory of the people of their day. They were established at local level with each one having its own criteria for the listing of names and dates. Revising memorials to address modern views or add names believed to have been omitted is therefore a matter that should be treated with caution.

Commonwealth War Graves Signage - adding to a churchyard

Adding a Name to a War Memorial

Caring for War Memorials

War memorials guidance for custodians

War memorials, maintenance

Register your war memorial

 

Trees

All work to trees should be undertaken by a qualified arborist working to BS 3998: 2010 Tree Work. Most work to trees can be undertaken under List B permission. A faculty is required to fell a tree that is established by an arborist's report to be neither dead, dying or dangerous. The assumption is that whenever possible trees are to be cared for and maintained as valuable additions to the churchyard and local landscape.

CBC guidance on works to churchyard trees

Tree work - choosing an arborist

Tree work – Govt guidance note

National Joint Utilities Group Guidance on the planning, installing and maintenance of utility apparatus in proximity to trees

 

Notice Boards

This will be the first opportunity to make a connection with a visitor to your church so it is important that you get this right. Before you plan what it should say consider whether it is in the right place. If you’re thinking about getting a new board does it have to go where the old one was? Noticeboards are often placed in churchyards and their design, condition and style say as much about the church as the activities they list. Some signs will require local planning permission as well as a faculty.

Main noticeboards should contain the wording and/or the logo of The Church of England and Diocese of Sheffield. A faculty will be required for a new notice board or the refurbishment of an existing one. They need to be clear, easily read, uncluttered and well maintained. If you have more than one noticeboard, ensure they have the same style and colours and do not repeat information unnecessarily.

Church Notice Boards

Notice Board Presentation and Welcome

Diocesan logos, colours and notices guidance

Local Government Guide for Outdoor Signs (including planning permissions)

Flag flying

 

Churchyards for all

Caring for a large or old churchyard can take up considerable time. In order for the churchyard to be more conveniently maintained, the reordering of churchyards allows for monuments and headstones to be relocated and for kerbstones to be removed. The following links offer advice and support on the different approaches to caring for churchyards, their heritage and habitat. Many churches find setting up a Friends’ Group is a good way of finding additional help, support and ideas for the care of their churchyard.

Ancient Yew Project

Caring for God’s Acre

Historic Graveyards, Caring For

Quiet Garden Movement

Understanding your Churchyard

Wildlife in Churches

Yorkshire Wildlife Trust Living Churchyard Project

 

Family History

Barnsley, Doncaster Rotherham and Sheffield Councils have collectively produced a comprehensive directory of advice and sources for family historians which can be accessed by clicking on the link below. We regret we are unable to assist with searches for family history.

Tracing Ancestors in South Yorkshire